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British Film Institute Akira Kurosawa Centenary

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British Film Institute Akira Kurosawa Centenary

This very impressive British Film Institute touring programme finally reaches the west. Among the many highlights are a new digital restoration of Rashomon plus rare outings for his 1948 gangster flick Drunken Angel and his 1952 dissection of class and feudal morays They Who Step on the Tiger's Tail. Also showing and always worth seeing on the big screen are mighty revenge tragedy The Bad Sleep Well, meditative medical drama Red Beard, Shakespearean epic Ran, nuclear paranoia diatribe I Live in Fear, Kurosawa’s moving essay on mortality Living and much more. All life is here, you will not see any better films in Scotland over the next few months.

Ticket deals available – you’re going to need them.

GFT, Glasgow from Sun 11 Jul-Sun 22 Aug.

Ran

  • 1985
  • Japan/France
  • 162 min
  • 15
  • Directed by: Akira Kurosawa
  • Written by: Akira Kurosawa, Hideo Oguni, Masato Ide
  • Cast: Tatsuya Nakadai, Mieko Harada

Kurosawa's 'King Lear' is a bleak and despairing vision of mankind torn apart by disunity, personal vengeances and family feuds that produce no honour, no victors, just victims. An accomplished fusion of Japanese history and blood-drenched Shakespearean drama, this film grows more impressive with repeated viewings.

Rashomon

  • 5 stars
  • 1950
  • Japan
  • 88 min
  • 12
  • Directed by: Akira Kurosawa
  • Written by: Akira Kurosawa, Eijirō Hisaita, Fyodor Dostoevsky (novel)
  • Cast: Setsuko Hara, Yoshiko Kuga, Toshirō Mifune, Masayuki Mori, Takashi Shimura, Noriko Sengoku

Responsible for introducing Japanese cinema to the world market, this extraordinary film recounts four people's versions of a violent incident involving a nobleman and a bandit.

Drunken Angel

  • 1948
  • Japan
  • 98 min
  • 15
  • Directed by: Akira Kurosawa
  • Written by: Akira Kurosawa, Keinosuke Uegusa
  • Cast: Takashi Shimura, Toshirō Mifune, Reisaburo Yamamoto, Noriko Sengoku

A cocky young gangster comes to rely upon an alcoholic doctor in Kurosawa and Mifune's first collaboration.

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