List Film

Apocalypse Archives: Deepa Mehta, director of Midnight's Children

The Indo-Canadian filmmaker picks the films she'd save at the end of the world

Apocalypse Archives: Deepa Mehta, director of Midnight's Children

Pather Panchali

Pather Panchali English Subtitled - Part 1 by Boredtill

(Satyajit Ray, 1955)
Sheer cinematic poetry. It was the birth of a new Indian cinema. It is a simple, essential narrative told through the eyes of a small boy. Ray gives such beauty and poignancy to the simple and ordinary – something that only the best of films are able to achieve.

Time of the Gypsies

(Emir Kusturica, 1988)
I love this film because of the crazy magical world it creates. There are only a few occasions I can recall being completely transported to a different universe and this is one of them. It is a visually mesmerising piece about a lost culture and a beautiful coming of age tale. The mysticism and magic of the gypsy culture is perfectly captured in the filmmaking.


A heartbreaking meditation on the inevitable – death. A complex and achingly honest look at the meaning of love, loyalty and disintegration. One of the best films of this year. I was blown away by this – a must-see. Difficult though.


(Fatih Akin, 2004)
This is the birth of diaspora cinema. It’s a Turkish-German love story and clash of cultures story that’s filled with dark humour. It has a grittiness and edginess to it as well that is enhanced by a fantastic soundtrack. Even, almost ten years later, it is still fresh and on point.

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

(Ang Lee, 2000)
This was a never before experienced movie. Breathtaking. Balances moments of quiet beauty with edge of your seat action. Stunning choreography. A classic that is unforgettable and completely unique.

Midnight's Children Official Movie Trailer

Midnight's Children

  • 3 stars
  • 2012
  • Canada/UK
  • 146 min
  • 12A
  • Directed by: Deepa Mehta
  • Cast: Satya Bhabha, Shahana Goswami, Rajat Kapoor
  • UK release: 26 December 2012

Adapted from his own book by Salman Rushdie, this drama follows the travails of a pair of children born just as India gained independence from Britain.


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