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9 Arthur Street, Oswestry, Shropshire, SY11 1JN
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Bfi Thriller: The Wages Of Fear

  • PG

WHO CAN YOU TRUST?

Thrillers get our minds racing as well as our pulses, bringing the twists and turns of psychological and political intrigue together with edge-of-the seat action. We love to be in the grip of uncertainty, and to see our suspicions played out to their perilous conclusions. As well as offering the chance to revel in the work of masters of suspense like Alfred Hitchcock and enjoy the sheer thrill of danger and deception writ large on the big screen, this season is an opportunity to reflect on the way the thriller has evolved to reflect our personal fears in times of political uncertainty and social change.

The Wages Of Fear

Henri-Georges Clouzot more than earns his title as the 'French Hitchcock' in *The Wages of Fear. *Based on Georges Arnaud's 1950 *Le salaire de la peur, *and serving as the basis for William Friedkin's 1977 *The Sorcerer, *this adaptation brought Clouzot the international fame necessary to make *Les Diaboliques, *and marked him out as a master filmmaker.

In an unnamed South American country, four shady characters find themselves thrust together on a dangerous job. They are each offered $2,000 to drive two trucks of highly volatile nitroglycerine to a remote oil field. One truck is manned by the happy-go-lucky Luigi (Fulco Lulli) and calculating Bimba (Peter Van Eyck), the other by aging hood Jo (Charles Vanel) and the young Corsican Mario (Yves Montand in one of his first roles). Tension builds between the men as they inch their way over the treacherous mountain roads, in the knowledge that the slightest jolt could have explosive consequences.

*'The Wages of Fear *has no superior in the field of action-suspense' *The Guardian***

Director: : Henri-Georges Clouzot

France/Italy 1953

Cast: Yves Montand, Charles Vanel, Peter van Eyck, Folco Lulli, Véra Clouzot, William Tubbs

Run time: 131 mins

The BFI Thriller season takes place in cinemas across the UK, on BFI Player and BFI DVD, on broadcast television, and with education partners INTO FILM, and is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated new BFI book.

*With the support of the BFI, awarding funds from The National Lottery. *

Thu 14 Dec

£5–£7

Bfi Thriller: The Wages Of Fear

  • 12A

WHO CAN YOU TRUST?Thrillers get our minds racing as well as our pulses, bringing the twists and turns of psychological and political intrigue together with edge-of-the seat action. We love to be in the grip of uncertainty, and to see our suspicions played out to their perilous conclusions. As well as offering the chance to revel in the work of masters of suspense like Alfred Hitchcock and enjoy the sheer thrill of danger and deception writ large on the big screen, this season is an opportunity to reflect on the way the thriller has evolved to reflect our personal fears in times of political uncertainty and social change.The Wages Of FearHenri-Georges Clouzot more than earns his title as the 'French Hitchcock' in The Wages of Fear.Based on Georges Arnaud's 1950 Le salaire de la peur,and serving as the basis for William Friedkin's 1977 The Sorcerer,this adaptation brought Clouzot the international fame necessary to make Les Diaboliques,and marked him out as a master filmmaker.In an unnamed South American country, four shady characters find themselves thrust together on a dangerous job. They are each offered $2,000 to drive two trucks of highly volatile nitroglycerine to a remote oil field. One truck is manned by the happy-go-lucky Luigi (Fulco Lulli) and calculating Bimba (Peter Van Eyck), the other by aging hood Jo (Charles Vanel) and the young Corsican Mario (Yves Montand in one of his first roles). Tension builds between the men as they inch their way over the treacherous mountain roads, in the knowledge that the slightest jolt could have explosive consequences.'The Wages of Fearhas no superior in the field of action-suspense' The GuardianDirector: : Henri-Georges ClouzotFrance/Italy 1953Cast: Yves Montand, Charles Vanel, Peter van Eyck, Folco Lulli, Vra Clouzot, William TubbsRun time: 131 minsThe BFI Thriller season takes place in cinemas across the UK, on BFI Player and BFI DVD, on broadcast television, and with education partners INTO FILM, and is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated new BFI book.With the support of the BFI, awarding funds from The National Lottery.

Thu 14 Dec

£5–£7

The Death of Stalin

The Death of Stalin
  • 2017
  • UK/France
  • 1h 47min
  • 15
  • Directed by: Armando Iannucci
  • Cast: Jeffrey Tambor, Steve Buscemi, Jason Isaacs, Olga Kurylenko, Michael Palin, Simon Russell Beale, Paddy Considine, Andrea Riseborough, Rupert Friend

When Joseph Stalin abruptly dies in 1953, his subordinates immediately start jockeying for the position of his replacement. The political backstabbing makes for maximum black comedy and exuberant farce, and the deft interplay of a gifted cast makes the whole film a consistent joy.

Fri 15 Dec

Sold out

Sat 16 Dec

£5–£7

The LEGO Ninjago Movie

The LEGO Ninjago Movie
  • 2017
  • US / Denmark
  • 1h 41min
  • U
  • Directed by: Charlie Bean/Paul Fisher/Bob Logan
  • Cast: Dave Franco, Olivia Munn, Justin Theroux, Jackie Chan

Lloyd (Franco) is the son of evil Lord Garmadon (Theroux), who wants to conquer Ninjago; however, Lloyd is also one of the team of ninja dedicated to combatting Garmadon and his minions. Not the most inspired of the LEGO movies but bright, brash and amusing, with intricate action, lots of slapstick fun and a delightful sequence of a cat destroying a city.

Wed 20 Dec

£5–£7

Thu 21 Dec

£5–£7

Murder On The Orient Express

  • 12A

What starts out as a lavish train ride through Europe quickly unfolds into one of the most stylish, suspenseful and thrilling mysteries ever told. From the novel by best-selling author Agatha Christie, Murder on the Orient Express tells the tale of thirteen strangers stranded on a train, where everyones a suspect. One man must race against time to solve the puzzle before the murderer strikes again. Kenneth Branagh directs and leads an all-star cast including Penelope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Daisy Ridley and Josh Gad.Director: Kenneth Brannagh2017Cast: Kenneth Branagh, Johnny Depp, Daisy Ridley, Michelle Pfeiffer, Penelope Cruz, Josh Gad, Michael Pea, Judi Dench, Leslie Odom Jr., Derek JacobiRun time: 120 mins

Thu 14 Dec

£5–£7

Murder on the Orient Express

Murder on the Orient Express
  • 2017
  • US
  • 1h 54min
  • 12A
  • Directed by: Kenneth Branagh
  • Cast: Kenneth Branagh, Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Josh Gad, Derek Jacobi, Leslie Odom Jr., Michelle Pfeiffer, Daisy Ridley

Murder in the dead of night, a carriage of suspects trapped in an avalanche, and the world’s greatest detective is on hand to solve it. Against the odds, Branagh pulls off a stylish, first-class, surprisingly poignant retelling with fluid camerawork and a top cast, and has a fine old time as the arrogant, outrageously moustachioed Poirot.

Thu 14 Dec

£5–£7

Royal Ballet: The Nutcracker

Royal Ballet: The Nutcracker
  • 2017

A young girl’s enchanted present leads her on a wonderful Christmas adventure in this classical ballet, danced to Tchaikovsky’s magnificent score.

Sat 16 Dec

Sold out

Wed 20 Dec

Sold out

States Of Danger And Deceit: The Day Of The Jackal

  • 15

STATES OF DANGER AND DECEIT:EUROPEAN POLITICAL THRILLERS IN THE 1970sis a touring season of films curated by Andy Willis, Reader in Film Studies at the University of Salford and Senior Visiting Curator: Film at HOME, Manchester, presented as part of BFI THRILLER with the support of the BFI, awarding funds from The National Lottery.The ideological turmoil that marked the late 1960s and led to events such as May 68 in Paris gave way in the 1970s to a more strident politics that involved stark contrasts between left and right. During this period those within the establishment and those without seemed willing to act with violence to force the changes they sought for society. In response to this political moment a number of European filmmakers turned to the format of the thriller - sometimes seriously, sometimes with humour - offering as it did the opportunity to explore conspiracies, authoritarian regimes, and political violence.The Day Of The JackalIn 1971, Frederick Forsythe shot to bestseller status with his debut novel, The Day of the Jackal - taut, utterly plausible, almost documentarian in its realism and attention to detail. Two years later, director Fred Zinnemann (High Noon) turned a gripping novel into a nail-biting cinematic experience.August 1962: the latest attempt on the life of French President Charles de Gaulle by the far right paramilitary organisation, the OAS, ends in chaos, with its architect-in-chief dead at the hands of a firing squad. Demoralised and on the verge of bankruptcy, the OAS leaders meet in secret to plan their next move. In a last desperate attempt to eliminate de Gaulle, they opt to employ the services of a hired assassin from outside the fold. Enter the Jackal (Edward Fox, Gandhi): charismatic, calculating, cold as ice. As the Jackal closes in on his target, a race against the clock ensues to identify and put a stop to a killer whose identity, whereabouts and modus operandi are completely unknown.Co-starring a plethora of talent from both sides of the Channel, including Michael Lonsdale (Munich), Derek Jacobi (The Odessa File) and Cyril Cusack (1984) and featuring striking cinematography by Jean Tournier (Moonraker), The Day of the Jackal remains one of the greatest political thrillers of all time.Director: Fred ZinnemannGB/France 1973Cast: Edward Fox, Terence Alexander, Michel AuclairRun time: 140 minsPart of States of Danger and Deceit: European Political Thrillers in the 1970s, a touring season presented by HOME, Manchester. Programme curated by Andy Willis, Reader in Film Studies at the University of Salford and Senior Visiting Curator: Film at HOME, produced by Rachel Hayward, HOMEs Film Programme Manager, and coordinated by Jessie Gibbs, HOME Film Team. Presented with the support of the BFI, awarding funds from The National Lottery.

Thu 21 Dec

£5–£7

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